Category: 2002 subaru forester radiator fan fuse full version

2002 subaru forester radiator fan fuse full version

David Hobbs helped make these videos. We are still working to obtain content for your car, however the video above is believed to have similar characteristics as your car. The video above shows how to replace blown fuses in the interior fuse box of your Subaru Forester in addition to the fuse panel diagram location.

Electrical components such as your map light, radio, heated seats, high beams, power windows all have fuses and if they suddenly stop working, chances are you have a fuse that has blown out. If your Forester is experiencing electrical problems, you should always check the fuses first, because they are relatively easy to check and cheap to change. Some Subarus have multiple interior fuse boxes including in the trunk - the video above will show you where the interior fuse box of your Forester is located.

If your Forester has many options like a sunroof, navigation, heated seats, etc, the more fuses it has. Some components may have multiple fuses, so make sure you check all of the fuses that are linked to the component in question.

Subaru Forester (SF; 1997-2002) fuses

If you need to replace a blown fuse in your Forester, make sure you replace it with one that has the same amperage as the blown fuse. If checking and replacing the fuse for the component in question doesn't work, we recommend seeking assistance from a trusted professional mechanic. They should be able to figure out if the component needs to be replaced or if there is a short or some other problem with your Forester.

Odd electrical problems that come out of nowhere can often signify a blown engine fuse - check and change yours here! Driving with your phone pressed against your ear is illegal in many places. See how to talk hands free! If your transmission is running low on fluid, be sure to add some - find out how to do this here! If you have an electrical component that doesn't work, try replacing the fuse first.

Getting Started Prepare for the repair. Remove Cover Locate interior fuse box and remove cover. Locate Bad Fuse Find the fuse that is tied to the bad component. Remove Fuse Take out the fuse in question and assess if blown.

Test Component Secure the cover and test component. More Info. Additional information on interior fuses. Video Description. Other videos you might find helpful.

P0483 Cooling Fan Problem - Subaru Outback

Check for a blown engine fuse Odd electrical problems that come out of nowhere can often signify a blown engine fuse - check and change yours here! Pair your phone Driving with your phone pressed against your ear is illegal in many places. Seal minor power steering fluid leaks See how to seal up minor power steering fluid leaks Subaru Forester X 2.The air flow was perfectly normal, just not the normal cold Over the course of about 2.

Finally it was only blowing warm. Last week my good and honest mechanic checked it out and it was working fine for him. He recharged the system and added dye again. New complication: Everything seemed fine until 2 days ago. A few minutes later I tried it again and it came on. Then went off. I left the fan switch on and as I was driving it blasted on. He went to get the exact price and came back to say the tech note says when replacing the resistor that the blower motor must also be replaced, as the new resistor can ruin the old motor.

He said he could try just replacing the resistor by disconnecting the battery and doing some other stuff to prevent an electrical discharge. This car is 13 years old. No, a new resistor does not blow an old motor. The fan turns fine on high speed, I take it? If so, you likely just need the resistor pack. It is just a matter of unplugging the old and plugging in the new. If you can hold a tool, you can probably do it yourself. The lights on the fan unit worked, so it was getting power. Ah, okay.

It could be a connection to it, tho. Let me dig out a schematic for that car…. The speed switch has a separate contact just to turn the light on the fan switch on - that does not necessarily mean that the motor is getting power. They should. When you subsequently turn the AC back off, those fans should go back off as well.

Just saw your edits and cost estimates above. Replacing it will just cost you money but will not help. It could be the motor but there likely are other things that need to be checked first. There are two fuses dedicated to the AC 20 and Make sure they are seated well and not blown. Are the fans on the radiator on when you turn the AC on and the car is cold? I can check the fuses.Subaru 2. There are specific ways to test a Subaru 2.

Under the hood of each car lies a series of complex components, some of which heat up in the process of powering the engine, and others that exist to counter these effects and prevent things from overheating. From the thermostat and fans to the radiator and coolant reservoir, each part relies on the other to keep the engine cool for safe driving. Sometimes, however, things go awry, and a car experiences cooling problems that make it difficult — if not outright dangerous or impossible — to continue driving.

Such has been the case with Subaru 2. With applications made abroad — including parts made by the Japanese automaker — the speed of the cooling fan is controlled by a pulse—modulated fan motor. By way of contrast, in domestically made applications, fan speeds are activated by the powertrain control module. Either way, a fan can be diagnosed with the use of a code reader. As with other vehicles manufactured overseas, clogs can easily form in the cooling tubes of Subaru radiators due to very thin cross-sections.

Despite the fact that most original equipment OE coolants are formulated to last beyond the k mileage mark, the anti—electrolytic additives can degrade and cause corrosion within the radiator. Over time, pressure cycling can wear down the components of a cooling system. When pressure cycling occurs, coolant is forced by the radiator into the reservoir.

When it does occur, however, one of the following symptoms is usually the cause: a cold system with gases trapped in a cold thermostat, or disappearing coolant with no apparent leakage. When the system is cold, a head gasket leak could cause gasses to get trapped inside. With no way to escape from the closed thermostat, gas pressure can mount inside the engine and cause a reverse flow of coolant through the radiator and back to the reservoir.

When worse comes to worst, the reservoir overflows, the coolant is lost and the system overheats. The other symptom involves leakage with no actual evidence. In this situation, the coolant repeatedly needs replenishing, despite there being no trace of oil or fluid on the ground.

The likely reason is that coolant is being sucked into the head gasket and ejected from the exhaust. Signs of this occurring include coolant residue on the spark plug insulator, which indicates that coolant has entered the cylinder; and milky brown engine oil, which would prove that the head gasket has leaked.

Another sign we talk to customers about all the time is white exhaust smoke. This indicates coolant loss via a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by severe or chronic overheating.

To prevent this from happening, have your technician inspect your vehicle and explain that the coolant sensor and thermostat are properly calibrated. Furthermore, warm up and cool down the engine to test the reliability of the thermostat and sensor, and to vent any air that might be stuck in the cooling system.

In phase two 2. Models made before have been notorious for coolant leaks, which generally occur at the left—side gasket. The problem drew protests that prompted Subaru to extend its warranty plan and add an anti—leak cooling system conditioner. Like all cars, 2. As with head gaskets, the engine should be inspected by a technician during each oil change for evidence of leaks.

It must be stated that gasket leaks can and do persist without the formation of spots on the driveway. Subarus, in fact, are equipped with a fiber—lined pan underneath that captures and absorbs droplets of oil and coolant.The car is over heating. Heater working, coolant is clean but noticed fans weren't turning. Checked the main and sub fuses, they look good but can't understand why fans aren't working?

Is this the cause of the overheating? Is there a master switch for the fans? Do they need to be replaced? Thank you. FordNut answered 5 years ago. If it overheats at highway speeds, it's not the fan s. There is enough air-flow at. Next is thermostat. I will check the relays and fans. I did take the cap off the radiator while it heated up and noticed the fluid hardly moved. Is that thermostat or a pump? It could be either thermostat or pump, but thermostat is less expensive to try first, and here is a thread, but they get kinda weird talking about sunspots messing up gauge?

Dunno 'bout that We'll give it a try and let you know the results. You've been very helpful. Both of you. Well we changed the thermostat.

Still over heating. Trying the pump next. Oh, the fans are working also. Two less things to worry about. Let you know how it goes. Jerel answered 5 years ago. You asked the question completely wrong and the response diagram is backwards.

This forum, therefore, carries no credibility.The car is over heating. Heater working, coolant is clean but noticed fans weren't turning. Checked the main and sub fuses, they look good but can't understand why fans aren't working? Is this the cause of the overheating? Is there a master switch for the fans? Do they need to be replaced? Thank you. FordNut answered 5 years ago. If it overheats at highway speeds, it's not the fan s. There is enough air-flow at.

Next is thermostat. I will check the relays and fans. I did take the cap off the radiator while it heated up and noticed the fluid hardly moved. Is that thermostat or a pump?

Why aren't the radiator fans not working?

It could be either thermostat or pump, but thermostat is less expensive to try first, and here is a thread, but they get kinda weird talking about sunspots messing up gauge? Dunno 'bout that We'll give it a try and let you know the results. You've been very helpful. Both of you. Well we changed the thermostat. Still over heating. Trying the pump next. Oh, the fans are working also.

Two less things to worry about. Let you know how it goes. Jerel answered 5 years ago. You asked the question completely wrong and the response diagram is backwards. This forum, therefore, carries no credibility. Take your car to the shop genius. My attention was brought back to this thread by a click from somebody But Jarel the diagram is correct.

What, you think the hot coolant goes in the bottom of radiator? You are the one that loses all credibility with that. And just because the OP's syntax is not quite right we all knew what he was asking. Jeremiah answered 5 years ago. I just changed my radiator and thermostat out. Car is at normal temp while driving. I haven't seen fans kick on.It is the last line of defense between you and an overheating engine. Just because the radiator fan is not on does not mean that it is not working.

They are designed to only run when needed. There are a few simple reasons that the fan would not be cycling on. If it is blown, replacing the fuse will only solve the problem for a very limited period of time. Unless the wiring issue is fixed, the fuse will blow again. The wiring harness itself can go bad. Your author has personally had a shredded tire completely pull the fan wiring out of his vehicle.

It can happen. The fan wiring is some of the more vulnerable wiring in your Forester. You can test the voltage going from the fan relay to the fan itself. This video from Ratchets and Wrenches is a phenomenal resource on how to properly diagnose a wiring problem. Your engine temperature sensor is responsible for relaying your engine temp to the ECU.

Once the temp gets so hot, the ECU commands the radiator fan to come on. Depending on the model year and engine, the location varies. If it does end up being this sensor, they are very affordable. Without the coolant hitting the sensor, the temp reading will be significantly lower than the actual engine temp.

Adding coolant to a radiator dry enough not to trigger the engine temp sensor can cause problems from drastic temperature change.

Let it cool down first. Like any other clutch, a fan clutch will wear out over time. If everything else seems on the up and up, the springs in the fan clutch have worn past the point of proper function and can no longer do their job.

Of all the ones listed above, start with the coolant level, then check the fuse. Fan Clutch Like any other clutch, a fan clutch will wear out over time.The engine of a vehicle has a combustion chamber where continuous explosions take place and as such the engine heats up very quickly. To stop the engine from overheatingwe take the help of coolants that flow through a radiator into the engine.

A radiator fan is thus used to keep the temperature of the coolant in check. Thus, it has an important job. If the radiator fan fails or is not working properly, your car can get seriously damaged, and repairs would cost thousands of dollars.

Therefore, as soon as you feel that the radiator fan is not functioning, rush to the mechanic and get it fixed. A radiator fan can stop working due to various reasons. You need to know these symptoms to save your vehicle from a disaster. Almost everything electrical is supported by a fuse so that if there is an electrical surge going towards a piece of electronic equipment the fuse cuts the electric supply to that particular equipment saving it from destruction.

This is what we call a blown fuse. A blown fuse is no big deal and changing one does not cost a lot of money. If the fuse is blown simply replace it and that should solve the issue for you. Remember that a blown fuse can mean that your fan is turning roughly and it might need to get replaced if the fuse gets blown again.

Why aren't the radiator fans not working?

The ECU is responsible for starting the radiator fan once the engine gets hot. Therefore, if the temperature sensor is faulty, it is likely that the ECU is not receiving the proper signals and thus the fan is not working. You can solve this by locating the sensor found in the thermostat cover under the hood of your car and cleaning it or replacing it with a new one.

Some cars have 2 or more coolant temperature sensors — one for the ECU and one for the coolant fan, so make sure that you locate the right coolant sensor. If the fan is not working even when the car is heating up there might be a problem with the wiring. You need to inspect all the wiring leading into and out from the radiator fan. It is possible that a wire has worn out due to heat and needs replacement. All you have to do is unplug the wires from the radiator and check their integrity by using a voltmeter.

If the wires between the positive and negative are transmitting 12 volts of electricity when the fan should start then it should be good.

However, if there is any irregularity in the voltage supply then that means the wire is faulty and should be replaced. Similarly, if the wires are in perfect condition, you should inspect the relay, the task of which is to supply electricity to the wires. The relay is a small box-like structure that can wear out due to extensive use. Replace the relay and your fan should start working perfectly again.


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